What does the lottery warn readers about?

What does The Lottery warn us about?

Shirley Jackson uses her short story “The Lottery” as a thinly-veiled warning about the dangers of blindly following tradition. … Jackson uses the brutal lottery as a terrifying example of when tradition overrides common sense and decency.

What is the moral lesson of the story The Lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition. In the story, Tessie Hutchinson doesn’t speak out against the lottery or try to change the status quo until she herself is affected.

How does The Lottery make the reader feel?

The first paragraph of “The Lottery” is primarily a description of the setting. It evokes feelings of warmth and security—with a sunny sky overhead boding a good day. … In every way, the setting seems bursting with promise and life. Of course, this contrasts sharply with the outcome of the story.

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Does The Lottery have a message for readers?

As the story continues, Jackson reveals her message by expecting readers to infer that while in a given society, it is difficult to see the traditions that are kept which hurt the society. The characters certainly show forms of uncomfortability, but they do not do anything about it.

Does the conclusion of the lottery seem to come as a surprise?

The conclusion of this story is a surprise because, in my opinion, no one in their right mind would expect it given the setting and what has come before. Look at how the lottery happens. Everyone gathers, they’re chatting in a friendly way with each other. It is a beautiful day in a nice little village.

Why is Mrs Hutchinson upset?

Mrs. Hutchinson is upset when she draws the slip of paper with the black spot because this indicates that she has “won” the lottery, meaning she will become the town’s annual sacrifice.

Why was Tessie killed in the lottery?

Tessie is stoned to death because she’s the “winner” of the lottery. The townspeople seem to believe that unless they sacrifice one of their own, crops will fail. It’s an old tradition, and very few think to question it at all.

What is Shirley Jackson trying to tell us about ourselves?

She is trying to tell us that we should be guided by our moral compass, not merely by the expectations of society. If something is unjust or wrong, we should stand up against it.

How much money can you get from the lottery?

So, let’s say you decide to take the cash option when you win the Mega Millions jackpot. If the jackpot remains at $515 million for Friday’s drawing, the cash option is $346.3 million. The federal government will immediately take $83,112,000 from that cash option (24%), leaving you $263,188,000.

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What does the black box symbolize in the lottery?

The Black Box

The shabby black box represents both the tradition of the lottery and the illogic of the villagers’ loyalty to it. The black box is nearly falling apart, hardly even black anymore after years of use and storage, but the villagers are unwilling to replace it.

How do you find the ending of the story the lottery?

By Shirley Jackson

Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

Who is late to the lottery?

When Tessie Hutchinson arrives late to the lottery, admitting that she forgot what day it was, she immediately stands out from the other villagers as someone different and perhaps even threatening.