What does the setting symbolize in the lottery?

How does the setting in the lottery affect the story?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

Why is the setting of the lottery ironic?

The essence of irony is opposition. The setting in Jackson’s “The Lottery” is ironic because what the story suggests, and what the reader expects of the setting while reading (normal village with normal people who do normal things) turns out to be untrue. Opposition, or opposites.

How does the setting in the lottery contribute to the story’s surprising ending?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” really helps to surprise the reader at the end of the story, because everything about the setting stands in sharp contrast to the violence that happens in the final paragraphs. The story ends with an entire community gleefully stoning a fellow community member to death.

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What is the setting at the beginning of the lottery?

The primary setting is a small village of about 300 people. The people are gathered in the town square for “the lottery.” Jackson leads us to believe that the town may be a farm community, because the townspeople talk of crops and farming machinery.

What is the setting of the lottery Why is it important?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. … The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

What is the plot of the lottery?

The plot of “The Lottery” involves the selection of a lottery “winner” out of the residents of a small fictitious town. The “winner” will be sacrificed to ensure that the year’s crops are good.

How is The Lottery ironic in the story usually a lottery winner?

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The title of Jacksons’s story is, therefore, ironic because, in her lottery, the winner does not receive a prize; she is, in fact, condemned to death. This adds an extra layer of irony because Jackson’s winner actually loses the biggest and most desirable prize of all: the gift of life.

How is the title The Lottery ironic?

What brings the irony to the title, is that the reader will tend to give the semantic meaning to the word “lottery”, assuming that it is a chance, an opportunity to earn or win something. In fact, that is precisely what a lottery is: A situation whose outcome is entirely dependant on chance.

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How * does * the * Author * Shirley * Jackson * foreshadow * what * is * to * come ?*?

Jackson starts to foreshadow the climax by creating some anticipation with the children and when the black box was pulled out. … She also foreshadows it when Mrs. Hutchinson says that it is not fair, when the Hutchinson family was pulled the first time.

How does the setting of The Lottery contribute to the meaning of the short story?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s short story The Lottery contributes greatly to the outcome of the story. First, the setting of the story is ironic. The morning of June 27th was clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green.