Who is the symbol of tradition in the lottery?

How is tradition shown in the lottery?

For all the villagers, the lottery is a normal ritual of society, and they have to participate every year. Their tradition says that someone has to die in order for the crops to grow. No one confronts the tradition. … Tessie’s death is an example of how society can persecute innocent people for no reason.

What does Mrs Hutchinson symbolize in the lottery?

Tessie Hutchinson

This name is an allusion to Anne Hutchinson, a prominent woman in colonial America who has become a symbol for religious protesters. Anne challenged the religious interpretations of the established Puritan clergy in Massachusetts and was banished from the Massachusetts Bay colony.

Is tradition a theme in the lottery?

One of the themes is tradition. … It was a tradition that each family attended the lottery regardless of the outcomes or how busy they were; everyone simply had to show up even the children. The Town’s people followed this tradition whole heartedly for many years. However some of the villagers like Mr.

What is the moral of the story of lottery?

The moral of the story is that simply because something has always been done does not mean that it is beneficial and should be continued. One key theme of “The Lottery” is the danger of tradition and blindly following along. … They don’t quite recall how the lottery started.

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Do you agree with Mrs Hutchinson is the lottery unfair?

Answer: Mrs. Hutchinson does not find the lottery unfair, until her husband is picked as a winner. It is only when the lottery directly affects her life that she complains about it.

Why is Mrs Hutchinson upset in the lottery?

Mrs. Hutchinson is upset when she draws the slip of paper with the black spot because this indicates that she has “won” the lottery, meaning she will become the town’s annual sacrifice.

Which statement is a theme of the lottery?

The main themes in “The Lottery” are the vulnerability of the individual, the importance of questioning tradition, and the relationship between civilization and violence. The vulnerability of the individual: Given the structure of the annual lottery, each individual townsperson is defenseless against the larger group.

What point is the lottery making about rules?

The point is, follow the rules, because those are the rules. The point of the story as a whole to the reader though is a warning against blindly following rules. The lottery system seems stupid to the reader only because most readers would question the law in the first place.

Why do they keep the tradition in the lottery?

Just as the villagers in “The Lottery” blindly follow tradition and kill Tessie because that is what they are expected to do, people in real life often persecute others without questioning why. As Jackson suggests, any such persecution is essentially random, which is why Tessie’s bizarre death is so universal.