How long does it take to read the Lottery by Shirley Jackson?

How many pages is the lottery?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780374529536
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 34,506
Product dimensions: 8.32(w) x 5.52(h) x 0.85(d)
Age Range: 14 – 18 Years

Is the Lottery by Shirley Jackson rigged?

As its very title suggests, Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery” focuses on an apparent game of chance. Unless lotteries are rigged, they are supposed to be decided purely by accident, not by any design. … In this lottery, however, there seems no escape clause.

Why does Tessie say the lottery is unfair?

Tessie thinks the lottery is unfair because she won. If someone else won, she would not have complained at all. This is an example of situational irony in that the readers do not expect that the winner of the lottery will be killed.

Who is late to the lottery?

When Tessie Hutchinson arrives late to the lottery, admitting that she forgot what day it was, she immediately stands out from the other villagers as someone different and perhaps even threatening.

What does the black box symbolize in the lottery?

The Black Box

The shabby black box represents both the tradition of the lottery and the illogic of the villagers’ loyalty to it. The black box is nearly falling apart, hardly even black anymore after years of use and storage, but the villagers are unwilling to replace it.

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Is the lottery based on a true story?

It might seem strange that so many people thought the story was factual, but, as Franklin notes, “at the time The New Yorker did not designate its stories as fact or fiction, and the ‘casuals,’ or humorous essays, were generally understood as falling somewhere in between.”

How long does it take to read the lottery?

The average reader will spend 5 hours and 20 minutes reading this book at 250 WPM (words per minute). One of the most terrifying stories of the twentieth century, Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker in 1948.

Why did Merricat poison her family?

The reason Merricat poisoned her family: their father was abusing Constance and herself. We don’t know for sure that it was specifically sexual abuse, but it’s strongly hinted. … Also in both novel and film, he’s very clearly after the Blackwood money.