Quick Answer: What is the mood of the narrator in the story the lottery?

What is the mood in The Lottery?

In ‘The Lottery,’ the mood begins as light and cheerful, but shifts to tense and ominous.

What is the mood as the story begins in The Lottery?

As the lottery gets underway, the mood of the story also becomes anxious and unsettling. When Tessie Hutchinson’s name is called, the mood shifts to dreadful and violent as the community members prepare to stone her to death.

What is the narrator’s tone in the story The Lottery?

In The Lottery, the narrator’s tone is neutral and removed, which, although odd considering the violent content of the story, is a logical choice for…

What is the tone at the end of The Lottery?

Deadpan, Detached, Calm.

What does lottery symbolize?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel. … Nevertheless, the lottery continues, simply because there has always been a lottery.

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What is the general mood of the villagers in the lottery?

The mood of the town is festive and carefree. The children are out of school for the summer, the men are talking about “planting and rain, tractors and taxes,” and the women are enjoying a bit of gossip. It is a good day for all three hundred residents of the town–so far.

What is the tone and mood of the lottery?

The tone of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” may be described as moving from tranquil to apprehensive and disturbing. The narrator’s tone in telling the story is objective and detached.

Why do the villagers continue to hold the lottery?

The lottery’s origins are steeped in the superstitious belief that one innocent villager must be sacrificed each year in order to increase the harvest yield. … Simply put, the villagers continue to participate in the lottery because it is a tradition.

Why can’t Clyde Dunbar not draw for his family?

Clyde Dunbar’s wife drew for him because he couldn’t attend. Clyde Dunbar broke his leg and is not able to attend the village’s annual lottery. This does not get him out of it, though. … “Wife draws for her husband.” Mr.

Do you find the narrator’s tone strange or even shocking The Lottery?

Throughout Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” the narrator’s tone is matter-of-fact, if not reminiscent, which is rather strange and makes the ending of the story even more shocking considering its brutality.